sábado, 19 de novembro de 2016

Van Der Graaf Generator - The 13th



Do Not Disturb is the thirteenth studio album by British progressive rock band Van der Graaf Generator. It was released, on Esoteric Recordings, on 30 September 2016.

Reviewing the album for TeamRock, Kris Needs said:

If, as Peter Hammill has indicated, this is the last Van der Graaf album, these winners of Prog’s Lifetime Achievement award this year are going out with the kind of mind-joltingly gorgeous roller coaster that made them one of the greatest genuinely progressive bands of all time. But there’s also a noticeably reflective aura and sense of closure around their 13th album, which came about by Hammill sending organist Hugh Banton and drummer Guy Evans a CD of the new songs, which they spent a week rehearsing, another week recording backing tracks, then six months overdubbing and tweaking at their home studios.

Reviewing the album for RTE, Paddy Kehoe said:

There is sometimes on the album a languorous air of Pink Floyd’s haunted pastoralism, or you could imagine Floyd’s keyboards maestro, the late Richard Wright singing one or two of the songs. "Alfa Berlina" opens with choral voices looped backwards and traffic noises. “I’ve got a lifetimes library of unreliable mementos” begin the lyrics – these guys have lived, and then some. Forever Falling's Gibson guitar groove is reminiscent of Jethro Tull, and, like many of the others tracks, it suddenly shifts tempo about a minute in. How on earth did they rehearse these things? One gathers a lot of earnest work went into the creation of this record.

"(Oh No I Must Have Said) Yes" is so prog it kind of parodies the genre itself, but then it gets kind of jazz fusion towards the close. There is something fey and pretty about "Brought to Book", with, once again Richard Wright’s spirit somehow wafting about, as it seems to also on the final, wisftul track, "Go". An Interesting vein of songs, an album with a strangely compelling trajectory.



Writing in The Quietus, Richard Rees Jones said:

To a greater extent here than on previous trio outings, VdGG make efforts to compensate for the absence of Jackson with a more varied instrumental palette. These songs are like compressed multi-part epics, lurching deliriously from moments of piano-led tranquillity to ragged guitar-and-drums freakouts. Banton augments his organ work with deep, resonant bass and tender washes of accordion, there’s a (tad overlong, to tell the truth) jazzy break in the middle of the exuberant rocker “(Oh No I Must Have Said) Yes”, while the frenetic instrumental coda to “Almost the Words” is as wild and driven as anything you’ll hear all year. Only on the plaintive closing track “Go” does the mood finally darken, with Hammill’s tone of weary resignation looming over Banton’s desolate organ: “more or less, all for the best, in the end it’s all behind you.”

Inevitably there’s nothing here to rival the dark majesty of Van der Graaf Generator’s classic 1970s work, and newcomers should start with Still Life, Godbluff or Pawn Hearts. But Do Not Disturb is a worthy addition to the group’s canon and – if this is indeed their last album – a fitting end to an illustrious career.








Este veio do coração de Peter Hammil
Thanks Peter


2 comentários:

  1. Olá, pessoal...

    Realmente um álbum especial - dito como o "último"
    deste espetacular grupo que sabe desenvolver as nuances
    do verdadeiro rock progressivo como nenhum outro.

    Já nasceu clássico!!!

    Peter Hammill - SP

    @Javanes:

    tenho mais alguns Zappa's na manga:

    - Frank Zappa - ZAPPAtite (Frank Zappa's Tastiest Tracks) (2016)
    - Frank Zappa - Solid Gold - Live to Air 2016
    - Frank Zappa - Chicago 78...vc tem estes???

    ResponderExcluir
  2. Fala Peter,

    Obrigado por este álbum e por comparecer sempre.

    Cara, manda os Zappas.. O Chicago 78 eu tenho, mas estes outros nào!
    Obrigado e um grande abraço

    ResponderExcluir

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